CEN Guide to the Use of Character Sets in EuropeTC 304

8-bit Character sets - ISO/IEC 8859


Current edition

This is a multi-part standard.

ISO 8859
Information processing - 8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets
- Part 1: Latin alphabet No.1 (1997) - second edition
- Part 2: Latin alphabet No.2 (1998) - second edition
- Part 3: Latin alphabet No.3 (1998) - second edition
- Part 4: Latin alphabet No.4 (1998) - second edition
- Part 5: Latin/Cyrillic alphabet (1998 - second edition
- Part 6: Latin/Arabic alphabet (1998) - second edition
- Part 7: Latin/Greek alphabet (1998) - second edition
- Part 8: Latin/Hebrew alphabet (1998) - second edition
- Part 9: Latin alphabet No.5 (1998) - second edition
- Part 10: Latin alphabet No.6 (1998) - second edition
- Part 11: Latin/Thai alphabet (1998)
- Part 12: Unassigned
- Part 13: Latin alphabet No.7 (1998)
- Part 14: Latin alphabet No.8 (1998)
- Part 15: Latin alphabet No.9 (1998)

Description

Each part of this standard contains the specification of a set of graphic characters for the GL and GR areas of an 8-bit code table. For each part, the GL area contains the G0 set of ISO/IEC 4873 (ISO-IR 6, the ASCII character set), so that only the 96 character positions of the GR area vary between the parts.

The GR area makes use of single-byte coding and contains no non-spacing diacritical marks (or other combining characters). The repertoire of the code therefore comprises at most 191 graphic characters including the SPACE character, one for each of the 191 available code positions.

Tutorial guidance

Each part of ISO/IEC 8859 specifies a character set that is suitable both for data and text processing applications and for information interchange.

The GR area of each of the Latin Alphabets includes a selection of accented Latin letters, and possibly also additional Latin letters such as Icelandic letters Þ (capital letter thorn), þ (small letter thorn) and ð (small letter eth). [Note that some WWW browsers may not display these characters correctly.] Each of these parts is suitable for multiple-language applications using the Latin script. The remaining five parts contain characters from a non-latin script in the GR area, as indicated by their title.

Each part specifying a Latin Alphabet lists the languages for which it has been designed. These are:

Latin Alphabet No.1
Albanian, Basque, Breton, Catalan, Danish, Dutch, English, Faroese, Finnish, French (with restrictions), Frisian, Galician, German, Greenlandic, Icelandic, Irish Gaelic (new orthography), Italian, Latin, Luxemburgish, Norwegian, Portuguese, Rhjaeto-Romanic, Scotish Gaelic, Spanish and Swedish.
Latin Alphabet No.2
Albanian, Croat, Czech, English, German, Hungarian, Latin, Polish, Romanian, Slovak, Slovene and Sorbian.
Latin Alphabet No.3
Esperanto and Maltese, and if needed in conjunction with these, English, French (with restrictions), German, Italian, Latin and Portuguese. Coding of Turkish characters is deprecated in this code.
Latin Alphabet No.4
Danish, English, Estonian, Finnish, German, Greenlandic, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Norwegian S&AACUTEmi (with restrictions), Slovene and Swedish.
Latin Alphabet No.5
Albanian, Basque, Breton, Catalan, Danish, Dutch, English, Faroese, Finnish, French (with restrictions), Frisian, Galician, German, Greenlandic, Irish Gaelic (new orthography), Italian, Latin, Luxemburgish, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Rhaeto-Romanic, Scottish Gaelic, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish.
Latin Alphabet No.6
Danish, English, Estonian, Faroese, Finnish, German, Greenlandic, Icelandic, Irish Gaelic (new orthography), Latin, Lithuanian, Norwegian, S&AACUTEmi (with restrictions), Slovene and Swedish.
Latin Alphabet No.7
Danish, English, Estonian, Finnish, German, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Slovene and Swedish.
Latin Alphabet No.8
Albanian, Basque, Breton, Catalan, Cornish, Danish, Dutch, English, French (with restrictions), Frisian, Galician, German, Greenlandic, Irish Gaelic (old and new orthographies), Ialian, Latin, Luxemburgish, Manx Gaelic, Norwegian, Portuguese, Rhaeto-Romanic, Scottish Gaelic, Spanish, Swedish and Welsh.
Latin Alphabet No.9
Albanian, Basque, Breton, Catalan, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Faroese, Finnish, French, Frisian, Galician, German, Greenlandic, Icelandic, Irish Gaelic (new orthography), Italian, Latin, Luxemburgish, Norwegian, Portuguese, Rhaeto-Romanic, Scotish Gaelic, Spanish and Swedish

For writing French, three characters not included in Latin Alphabets 1, 3, 5 and 8, are also needed. These are included in Latin Alphabet No.9.

The Skolt S&AACUTEmi dialect, and older S&AACUTEmi orthography, require certain additional characters. These have been registered in ISO-IR 158 and ISO-IR 197 in the ISO 2375 Register. ISO/IEC 8859-10 recommends the use of that character set as a G2 or G3 code element together with the GL and GR sets of ISO/IEC 8859-10 as G0 and G1 code elements when these characters are required.

ISO-IR 182 was registered to be an alternative GR set for ISO/IEC 8859-1 to cover the Welsh language. Use of Latin Alphabet No.8 is now recommended for that purpose.

The coded character sets of the GR areas of each part of ISO/IEC 8859 are included in the ISO 2375 Register. With the exception of parts 10 to 15 they are also included in ISO/IEC 10367. For the registration number and escape sequences assigned to these sets, see the guide to ISO/IEC 10367.


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